About us

The founding of Pondok Bamboe Koening (PBK) was greatly inspired by the environment that the founders exposed to, that was bakmi in Jakarta and Hakka food culture. Hence the choice of the word Bamboe Koening (Yellow Bamboo) was chosen because of its resemblance to bakmi – yellow in colour, with long and springy attributes of bamboo. The word Pondok (Hut) was then added due to the characteristic of the establishment that is modest, not overly large.

Hakka influence can be seen in the dishes such as the traditional mie (mie ayam, babi, etc), BabiSamcan (扣肉: Kòuròu – Mandarin), and Babi Special (燜豬肉: Mèn zhūròu – Mandarin). All of the dishes served in PBK are made in-house, with the exception of fish ball, rice noodle, and flat rice noodle. Unlike many other establishments serving noodle, PBK made their own bakmi without any addition of preservative or colouring. Additionally, no MSG is added in all of the dishes – just right combination of salt, sugar, pepper, and other sauces – so you can enjoy our food worry free!

Bakmi

Bakmi/Mie (肉麵: Ròu miàn – Mandarin, bah-mī – Hokkien) is a wheat based noodle which was brought to Southeast Asia by Chinese immigrants with Hokkien origin, generally prepared and topped with minced soy-sauce pork and few sliced of BBQ pork (叉燒), addition of Chinese green vegetable leaf and a bowl of Broth.

The most common type of bakmi/mie in Indonesia is mi kuning, or yellow noodles where the colour is due to the addition of eggs in the wheat mixture.  This type of bakmi/mie should not be confused with the thick yellow Hokkien mie that primarily used to stir fry with vegetables and meat, as this bakmi/mie has more soft and springy texture that sets it apart from the Hokkien mie.

As the majority of Indonesian population is Moslem, local people adjusted the topping from pork to chicken (Mie Ayam) or mixture of chicken and mushroom (Mie Ayam Jamur) which is quite a common recipe amongst Indonesians.  Some of its food companions are wonton (pangsit) and beef ball (bakso sapi).  Another way to process bakmi/mie is to stir fry which gives way to a dish called Mie Goreng that is quite popular even amongst people in western countries.   As its popularity grew, these dishes can be found in Indonesia, either in a fancy restaurant or a humble travelling cart.

Hakka

The Hakka (客家: Kè jiā – Mandarin) people are Han Chinese people who speak the Hakka Chinese language and have links to the provincial areas of Guangdong, Jiangxi, Guangxi, Sichuan, Hunan and Fujian in China.  The Chinese characters for Hakka (客家) literally mean “guest families”. 

The Hakka’s ancestors were often said to have arrived from what is today’s central China centuries ago and north China a thousand years ago.  In a series of migrations, the Hakkas moved, settled in their present locations in south China, and then often migrated overseas to various countries throughout the world.  Their mass migrations and pioneering spirit caused them to be nicknamed as the “Jews of Asia”.  Hakka people in Jakarta mainly have Meizhou origin who came in the 19th century. Secondary migration of the Hakkas from other provinces like Bangka Belitung and West Borneo came later.

The Hakka people have a marked cuisine and style of Chinese cooking which is little known outside the Hakka home.  It concentrates on the texture of food – the hallmark of Hakka cuisine. Whereas preserved meats feature in Hakka delicacy, stewed, braised, roast meats – ‘texturized’ contributions to the Hakka palate – have a central place in their repertoire. In fact, the raw materials for Hakka food are no different from raw materials for any other type of regional Chinese cuisine: what you cook depends on what is available in the market.  Hakka cuisine may be described as outwardly simple but tasty.  The skill in Hakka cuisine lies in the ability to cook meat thoroughly without hardening it, and to naturally bring out the proteinous flavour (umami taste) of meat.

Pondok Bamboe Koening

The founding of Pondok Bamboe Koening (PBK) was greatly inspired by the environment that the founders exposed to, that was bakmi in Jakarta and Hakka food culture.  Hence the choice of the word Bamboe Koening (Yellow Bamboo) was chosen because of its resemblance to bakmi – yellow in colour, with long and springy attributes of bamboo.  The word Pondok (Hut) was then added due to the characteristic of the establishment that is modest, not overly large.

Hakka influence can be seen in the dishes such as the traditional mie (mie ayam, babi, etc), Babi Samcan (扣肉: Kòu ròu – Mandarin), and Babi Special (燜豬肉: Mèn zhūròu – Mandarin).  All of the dishes served in PBK are made in-house, with the exception of fish ball, rice noodle, and flat rice noodle.  Unlike many other establishments serving noodle, PBK made their own bakmi without any addition of preservative or colouring.  Additionally, no MSG is added in all of the dishes – just right combination of salt, sugar, pepper, and other sauces – so you can enjoy our food worry free!